Food Fraud

The Elliot Firm is investigating several food manufacturers and importers for so-called food fraud, in which the manufacturer or seller labels a cheaper, poor-quality product as if it were a higher-quality product and charges the consumer a higher price. Examples include fake olive oil made from cheap soy or cottonseed oil and artificial flavors, chemically-flavored “truffle oil,” falsely-labeled fish products  — fish labeled as “red snapper” is often the much cheaper tilapia or the potentially dangerous tilefish — and “all-natural” fruit-flavored drinks and snacks that in reality are artificially flavored. 
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False Advertising, Fake “Natural” Foods

Some companies play by the rules and advertise their food and beverage products honestly.  Other companies try to take advantage of consumers’ preferences for natural foods by claiming that their products are “all natural” even when those products contain artificial flavors and other artificial and synthetic chemical ingredients. The Elliot Firm is currently investigating companies selling products with undisclosed artificial ingredients, some of them even claiming their products have “No artificial flavors!”  Energy drinks and fruit-flavored drinks and snacks in particular 
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Securities Fraud, Socially-Responsible Investors

The Elliot Firm brings shareholders’ actions to recover money lost due to fraud on the market, deliberate or negligent false statements, and self-dealing by the management of publicly-traded corporations. The firm also investigates, through Books and Records demand inspections, potential violations of securities and other ethical laws in order to compensate socially-responsible shareholders whose investments have been damaged by unlawful or unethical actions by corporate management.
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Herbal “Weight Loss” Supplements

Unscrupulous manufacturers continue to try to dupe consumers into believing that a “miracle plant” herbal supplement can cause weight loss without any change in diet or exercise.  These products are almost all bogus and almost all are falsely advertised — many of them don’t even contain any of the “miracle” herb that they advertise they’re made of!
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